FIGHT THE ULTIMATE EVIL!
((This was TimBoxReloaded Tumblr Post #1,756!))

FIGHT THE ULTIMATE EVIL!

((This was TimBoxReloaded Tumblr Post #1,756!))

Last time, I talk about making my lifelong dream and ambitious attempt to transform a cartoon called Dexter’s Laboratory into an animated cartoon epic done on a very grand epic scale and scope called Dexter’s Odyssey not just as an animated movie but as an elaborate epic roadshow event to an extent not seen since the demise of the roadshow theatrical release of epic movies in the 1970s.

And maybe I might even make Dexter’s Odyssey in some old widescreen format system that incorporates both large-format 65mm or 70mm widescreen and anamorphic lenses, Ultra Panavision, that is.

Ultra Panavision 70, aka MGM Camera 65, was once used on movies such as Ben-Hur (1959) and It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963) before fading out after 1966’s Khartoum.

Sure, I may or may not use Ultra Panavision 70 to film the animation for Dexter’s Odyssey, and like I said, Ultra Panavision 70 itself may present several challenges especially to the layout artist and especially to the digital intermediate team, such as the need for different kinds of wider stagings for smaller number of characters or more and the need for longer background to accommodate an extremely wide aspect ratio of approximately 1 to 2.76, but at least the extremely wide Ultra Panavision frames might allow for a more detailed approach, and despite the highly stylized treatment of the animation and design work, even in the extremely wide Ultra Panavision 70 aspect ratio of 2.76:1, there will be a whole lot of leisurely storytelling and not to mention a whole lot of substantial character development and action, even if, at one point, the result of such hard work may amount to presumably a total of sixty hours or less (not including intermission), itself divided into presumably twenty-four two-and-a-half-hour acts or less and spreading through twelve elaborate nights at the movie or more or less.

But I shall also make Dexter’s Odyssey in a 2.39:1 aspect ratio as well to ensure that all theaters (especially those outside the original roadshow world premiere engagement/event/experience) would be capable of screening it.

The sound for Dexter’s Odyssey might not only be mixed in Dolby Atmos, but also in a special multi-dimensional 70mm DTS/Datasat/Auro 3D digital sound system or so.

Anyway, I also wanted to present Dexter’s Odyssey not just as an animated movie about a boy in a lab coat, his sister in a ballerina’s tutu and her ballerina tutu-clad black and Asian friends on an epic quest to stop a rival neighbor gone evil and power-mad, but as an elaborate epic event and experience.

Miklos Rosza - Ben-Hur March Music Mix (Combination of Victory Parade/Panem et Circenses/Circus Parade of the Charioteers)
8 plays

Here are the following march music from Miklos Rosza’s Score for Ben-Hur (1959) combined together:

1) Victory Parade

2) Panem et Circenses

and

3) Circus Parade of the Charioteers

((I personally wanted the music for Dexter’s Odyssey (my ambitious attempt to transform the 1990s cartoon Dexter’s Laboratory into a sprawling, sweeping, monumental animated cartoon epic on a grand epic scale and scope) to be a sprawling epic score sorta like Miklos Rosza’s score for Ben-Hur and Howard Shore’s music for the Lord of the Rings films but also incorporating ethnic instrumental and vocal musical sounds a la Hans Zimmer’s Lion King score to give each and every culture that Dexter, Dee Dee, Mee Mee and Lee Lee encounter to have an appropriately authentic and ethnic texture. I wanted the sprawling epic score for Dexter’s Odyssey to create a satisfying arc from start to finish and to proceed with a symphonic, dramatic and ethnic logic that will embrace the world like a Mahler symphony albeit incorporating ethnic instrumental and vocal music into the orchestra also. Just Saying!))

Samurai Jack’s Father has a new magic sword in town.
From Samurai Jack The Birth of Evil Part II (2003).

Samurai Jack’s Father has a new magic sword in town.

From Samurai Jack The Birth of Evil Part II (2003).

The Aku Army corners Samurai Jack’s dad the Emperor of Japan in the Birth of Evil Part II

The Aku Army corners Samurai Jack’s dad the Emperor of Japan in the Birth of Evil Part II

The Aku Army of Mandark corners Dee Dee’s friend Lee Lee and Dexter from Dexter’s Laboratory (1996-2003), and the Do-Do from Porky in Wackyland (1938) as the Shangharai kingdom in Shanghara burns.
Cornered again, eh?

The Aku Army of Mandark corners Dee Dee’s friend Lee Lee and Dexter from Dexter’s Laboratory (1996-2003), and the Do-Do from Porky in Wackyland (1938) as the Shangharai kingdom in Shanghara burns.

Cornered again, eh?

TimBoxReloaded Tumblr Post #1,750:
I personally see my lifelong dream (and intended epic masterpiece) Dexter’s Odyssey as a mighty epic something other than an epic animated cartoon feature film loosely based on and inspired by a cartoon from the 1990s called Dexter’s Laboratory (and largely 2d Hand Drawn albeit with some CGI elements thrown in) that will see Dexter and his sister Dee Dee teaming up with Dee Dee’s friends Mee Mee and Lee Lee to go on an epic quest to stop Mandark, Dexter’s Rival gone evil and power mad, from enslaving the world and from bringing death and destruction to Dexter’s Lab and Dexter and Dee Dee’s neighborhood.
I also personally envision Dexter’s Odyssey as something that would be a hybrid of a film presentation and an elaborate epic event of some sort—something brand-new that might not even exist before, perhaps—and also something of an ambitious attempt to recreate (in the modern era) the prestige experience of attending a roadshow theatrical presentation of an epic movie back in the period from the 1950s up until 1970, and that will mean you better had to purchase tickets as you would for a concert or for a play or for a roadshow theatrical release of an epic movie back in the 1950s and 1960s,  For example: You, as an exhibitor, would had to run one or two show(s) a day, and people would had to buy tickets in advance, and people had to have reserved seats because it will be an elaborate epic movie event. 
And I, even as shepherd and director of the Dexter’s Odyssey project, might also help supervise and design every aspect of the Dexter’s Odyssey roadshow experience, from lighting and curtain cues to theater marquees and usher corps. And the theater staff must be trained properly to take each patron to their seat, and patrons would also receive beautiful souvenir programs, and that will be part of my show.
And I wanted the world premiere engagement for Dexter’s Odyssey, when all would be said and done about my project, to be not just a movie premiere, but also an elaborate epic roadshow event that will be the kind of elaborate epic motion picture event that you, as an audience, might even get dressed up to go to, and you all, as an audience, shall pay a higher ticket price than you would for a regular showing of a modern movie at your modern movie theater.
And so, I wanted Dexter’s Odyssey to not just be a movie (and even an animated cartoon one) that you all, as an audience, will go to, for it will be an elaborate epic experience of an event even in Cinemascope/Panavision 2.39:1 widescreen and even with immersive multi-dimensional Dolby Atmos sound playing around you all.
((I might unusually place all the credits at the beginning rather than usually at the end!))
Here is a guide from The American Widescreen Museum on how a roadshow presentation should be presented:
http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/widescreen/roadshow_presentation.htm
http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/widescreen/roadshow_presentation2.htm
http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/widescreen/roadshow_presentation3.htm
Anyway, I, as shepherd and director of the Dexter’s Odyssey project, am concerned with quality, and I wanted Dexter’s Odyssey to be exhibited (and presumably at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood with Dolby Atmos sound) in the purest roadshow manner imaginable, especially since the demise of the roadshow presentation of epic movies in 1970.
In addition to unusually placing all the usual credits at the beginning rather than usually at the end these days,  I also wanted Dexter’s Odyssey (which, in its most complete uncut roadshow form may amount to 60 hours of story or less, spreading through twenty-four feature length halves and presumably twelve nights at the movies) to feature a single overture, a filmed introduction from the producer or director or so(?), twenty four pieces of intermission exit music or less, twenty four pieces of intermission overtures or less and exit music following the fade out of the last title.
Dexter’s Odyssey is going to be a very special epic movie event and I demand that Dexter’s Odyssey be treated as such.
 And so, what would you think of that, even if Dexter’s Odyssey may possibly attempt to recreate (even in the modern digital age) the prestige experience of attending a roadshow theatrical presentation of an epic movie back in the period from the 1950s up until 1970?

TimBoxReloaded Tumblr Post #1,750:

I personally see my lifelong dream (and intended epic masterpiece) Dexter’s Odyssey as a mighty epic something other than an epic animated cartoon feature film loosely based on and inspired by a cartoon from the 1990s called Dexter’s Laboratory (and largely 2d Hand Drawn albeit with some CGI elements thrown in) that will see Dexter and his sister Dee Dee teaming up with Dee Dee’s friends Mee Mee and Lee Lee to go on an epic quest to stop Mandark, Dexter’s Rival gone evil and power mad, from enslaving the world and from bringing death and destruction to Dexter’s Lab and Dexter and Dee Dee’s neighborhood.

I also personally envision Dexter’s Odyssey as something that would be a hybrid of a film presentation and an elaborate epic event of some sort—something brand-new that might not even exist before, perhaps—and also something of an ambitious attempt to recreate (in the modern era) the prestige experience of attending a roadshow theatrical presentation of an epic movie back in the period from the 1950s up until 1970, and that will mean you better had to purchase tickets as you would for a concert or for a play or for a roadshow theatrical release of an epic movie back in the 1950s and 1960s,  For example: You, as an exhibitor, would had to run one or two show(s) a day, and people would had to buy tickets in advance, and people had to have reserved seats because it will be an elaborate epic movie event. 

And I, even as shepherd and director of the Dexter’s Odyssey project, might also help supervise and design every aspect of the Dexter’s Odyssey roadshow experience, from lighting and curtain cues to theater marquees and usher corps. And the theater staff must be trained properly to take each patron to their seat, and patrons would also receive beautiful souvenir programs, and that will be part of my show.

And I wanted the world premiere engagement for Dexter’s Odyssey, when all would be said and done about my project, to be not just a movie premiere, but also an elaborate epic roadshow event that will be the kind of elaborate epic motion picture event that you, as an audience, might even get dressed up to go to, and you all, as an audience, shall pay a higher ticket price than you would for a regular showing of a modern movie at your modern movie theater.

And so, I wanted Dexter’s Odyssey to not just be a movie (and even an animated cartoon one) that you all, as an audience, will go to, for it will be an elaborate epic experience of an event even in Cinemascope/Panavision 2.39:1 widescreen and even with immersive multi-dimensional Dolby Atmos sound playing around you all.

((I might unusually place all the credits at the beginning rather than usually at the end!))

Here is a guide from The American Widescreen Museum on how a roadshow presentation should be presented:

http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/widescreen/roadshow_presentation.htm

http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/widescreen/roadshow_presentation2.htm

http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/widescreen/roadshow_presentation3.htm

Anyway, I, as shepherd and director of the Dexter’s Odyssey project, am concerned with quality, and I wanted Dexter’s Odyssey to be exhibited (and presumably at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood with Dolby Atmos sound) in the purest roadshow manner imaginable, especially since the demise of the roadshow presentation of epic movies in 1970.

In addition to unusually placing all the usual credits at the beginning rather than usually at the end these days,  I also wanted Dexter’s Odyssey (which, in its most complete uncut roadshow form may amount to 60 hours of story or less, spreading through twenty-four feature length halves and presumably twelve nights at the movies) to feature a single overture, a filmed introduction from the producer or director or so(?), twenty four pieces of intermission exit music or less, twenty four pieces of intermission overtures or less and exit music following the fade out of the last title.

Dexter’s Odyssey is going to be a very special epic movie event and I demand that Dexter’s Odyssey be treated as such.

 And so, what would you think of that, even if Dexter’s Odyssey may possibly attempt to recreate (even in the modern digital age) the prestige experience of attending a roadshow theatrical presentation of an epic movie back in the period from the 1950s up until 1970?

Six years from now shall be the year of the 2020 Summer Olympics to be held in Tokyo, Japan.

I have got to think about what I’m going to come up with for my very own ‘Japan Project' (which can be either a lavishly created twelve-minute animated short film, or a lavishly created two-hour animated feature film; you may never know what I am going to come up with!) the 2020 Japanese Olympics or around that same year or longer.

I know!

Since I grew up with Genndy Tartakovsky’s Samurai Jack (2001-2004) and most especially his 2003 Emmy Award-winning ‘Birth of Evil' episodes from Samurai Jack, for my own ‘Japan Project’, why not tell a similarly epic tale of good versus evil set in feudal Japan—sorta like and along the lines of the 2003 Samurai Jack two-parter The Birth of Evil—in the form of a lavishly created animated short or feature film?

He may only appear in one Warner Bros, Cartoon short by Bob Clampett from 1938 that goes by the name of Porky in Wackyland…
But I like this Looney Tunes character so much…

That I want to include him for my lifelong dream and intended epic masterpiece, Dexter’s Odyssey.
And so, do you remember the Do-Do from Porky in Wackyland?

He may only appear in one Warner Bros, Cartoon short by Bob Clampett from 1938 that goes by the name of Porky in Wackyland

But I like this Looney Tunes character so much…

That I want to include him for my lifelong dream and intended epic masterpiece, Dexter’s Odyssey.

And so, do you remember the Do-Do from Porky in Wackyland?

The Two Fantasias.

Definitely two of my favorite Disney movies in the whole wide world. (In my opinion, to say the least.)