I have just finished watching Disney’s Frozen with my mother tonight.
And it was good, considering that this was the highest grossing animated film of all time in the 19-20 years since Lion King previously held that title in 1994.

I have just finished watching Disney’s Frozen with my mother tonight.

And it was good, considering that this was the highest grossing animated film of all time in the 19-20 years since Lion King previously held that title in 1994.

Aku’s first rampage from Genndy Tartakovsky’s Emmy Award-winning Birth of Evil episodes of his cult 2001-2004 cartoon show Samurai Jack.

And so…

What would you think if Aku, as he is seen in the 2003 two-part Emmy Award winning Samurai Jack episode, The Birth of Evil, would ever be projected on a giant IMAX movie screen if Samurai Jack The Birth of Evil would ever be presented in IMAX?

Here is the battle between Samurai Jack’s father and Aku from Samurai Jack: The Birth of Evil (2003)

So the question is:

When you will ever go see Genndy Tartakovsky’s Birth of Evil (2003) episodes from his cult cartoon show Samurai Jack (2001-2004) in IMAX someday (just like when Disney’s Fantasia 2000 (1999) was shown and presented in IMAX back in 1999 or 2000), would you ever be immersed as if you are right in the middle of the great battle between Samurai Jack’s Father, The Emperor of Japan, and the evil shape-shifting demon wizard Aku in Samurai Jack: The Birth of Evil—but this time on a giant IMAX movie screen (even if it is like watching a highly stylized cult action cartoon in the form of the biggest highly stylized cartoon mural on Earth, except that it’s moving cartoon images)?

Presenting for TimBoxReloaded Tumblr Post #1,640:

The Battle between Samurai Jack’s dad, the Emperor of Japan, and the Mini-Aku Samurai Army—all of which ends with Aku getting his ‘Jail Time’ thanks to Samurai Jack’s dad’s magic sword, so that his ‘Jailhouse’ could stick out amidst the trash that Aku has brought to The Emperor’s Japanese village.

((Screams the Emperor far and shrill!))

Screams the Emperor far and shrill!

((I wish Samurai Jack: The Birth of Evil (and especially a scene like this) could be shown and presented in IMAX, and if so, it will be like watching a highly stylized animated cult action cartoon like this (Genndy Tartakovsky’s Birth of Evil episodes from Samurai Jack) in the form of the biggest highly stylized cartoon mural on Earth, but it’s moving!))

This may sound totally unrealistic to some or many people at this point—at least considering that Samurai Jack is a great cult cartoon that nonetheless doesn’t normally has as much as a huge fan base just to tackle the likes of Disney’s Frozen (2013), The Lion King (1994) and/or such like, and sure, nobody, not even yours truly or Genndy Tartakovsky or his fans, can truly imagine or expect or predict that a theatrical big screen Samurai Jack feature film might end up being a giant mega-hit that succeed beyond the wildest dreams and expectations of yours truly, Genndy Tartakovsky himself or his fans, let alone such a phenomenon, but…
What if Genndy Tartakovsky’s Samurai Jack (the cartoon show itself and especially the character of Samurai Jack himself) might gain new-found fame if a theatrical big screen cinematic feature film that might bring Samurai Jack’s quest “to return to the past and undo the future that is Aku” to a true proper conclusion, might not only succeed where things like The Powerpuff Girls Movie (2002) failed to do years ago, but also succeed beyond even the wildest dreams of the cult animator who created Samurai Jack that is Genndy Tartakovsky himself and/or his fans—much to the surprise of everybody around the world—and in an almost completely unexpected way—and not to mention, topple Disney’s Frozen (2013) and The Lion King (1994) and/or such like to become one of, or if not, the highest grossing (and also one of, or if not, the most successful) animated feature film of all time, and in cinema history, and to the point of not only scaring Disney and other companies and filmmakers (such as the likes of Terminator/TItanic/Avatar director James Cameron)—Hollywood or otherwise—enough to start trying to step up their game even more, but at the same time inspire them to do something similar, even if the animation art style alone might end up becoming such a trendsetter?
Well, given that no one could truly imagine or expect or predict that a Samurai Jack feature film might become a giant mega-hit that succeeds beyond even the wildest dreams of yours truly, or the show’s fans, or Genndy Tartakovsky himself, or Genndy’s own fans, would you, or big screen audiences, (or even a whole new generation of young people—read: kids who have very little or no connection to Genndy Tartakovsky’s classic TV animations, but will still love anything with the ‘Cartoon Network’ or the ‘Samurai Jack’ or some other name on it) still pay to see a theatrical big screen Samurai Jack feature film if it finally becomes a reality, an actuality as well as a fact?
And would the public (or even at least modern audiences to whom hand drawn cartoons are now so alien) really accept a visual-heavy, almost-dialogue-free and largely hand drawn animated action movie involving a time-displaced feudal/Edo-period Japanese swordsman and a giant godlike demonic wizard?

This may sound totally unrealistic to some or many people at this point—at least considering that Samurai Jack is a great cult cartoon that nonetheless doesn’t normally has as much as a huge fan base just to tackle the likes of Disney’s Frozen (2013), The Lion King (1994) and/or such like, and sure, nobody, not even yours truly or Genndy Tartakovsky or his fans, can truly imagine or expect or predict that a theatrical big screen Samurai Jack feature film might end up being a giant mega-hit that succeed beyond the wildest dreams and expectations of yours truly, Genndy Tartakovsky himself or his fans, let alone such a phenomenon, but…

What if Genndy Tartakovsky’s Samurai Jack (the cartoon show itself and especially the character of Samurai Jack himself) might gain new-found fame if a theatrical big screen cinematic feature film that might bring Samurai Jack’s quest “to return to the past and undo the future that is Aku” to a true proper conclusion, might not only succeed where things like The Powerpuff Girls Movie (2002) failed to do years ago, but also succeed beyond even the wildest dreams of the cult animator who created Samurai Jack that is Genndy Tartakovsky himself and/or his fans—much to the surprise of everybody around the world—and in an almost completely unexpected way—and not to mention, topple Disney’s Frozen (2013) and The Lion King (1994) and/or such like to become one of, or if not, the highest grossing (and also one of, or if not, the most successful) animated feature film of all time, and in cinema history, and to the point of not only scaring Disney and other companies and filmmakers (such as the likes of Terminator/TItanic/Avatar director James Cameron)—Hollywood or otherwise—enough to start trying to step up their game even more, but at the same time inspire them to do something similar, even if the animation art style alone might end up becoming such a trendsetter?

Well, given that no one could truly imagine or expect or predict that a Samurai Jack feature film might become a giant mega-hit that succeeds beyond even the wildest dreams of yours truly, or the show’s fans, or Genndy Tartakovsky himself, or Genndy’s own fans, would you, or big screen audiences, (or even a whole new generation of young people—read: kids who have very little or no connection to Genndy Tartakovsky’s classic TV animations, but will still love anything with the ‘Cartoon Network’ or the ‘Samurai Jack’ or some other name on it) still pay to see a theatrical big screen Samurai Jack feature film if it finally becomes a reality, an actuality as well as a fact?

And would the public (or even at least modern audiences to whom hand drawn cartoons are now so alien) really accept a visual-heavy, almost-dialogue-free and largely hand drawn animated action movie involving a time-displaced feudal/Edo-period Japanese swordsman and a giant godlike demonic wizard?

Damn! That Aku is such a Super-King Kame-Hame-Ha Biatch of a godlike demon, isn’t he?
And if so, you know what Aku thinks of idiots and the universe in general, do ya?

Damn! That Aku is such a Super-King Kame-Hame-Ha Biatch of a godlike demon, isn’t he?

And if so, you know what Aku thinks of idiots and the universe in general, do ya?

I always wanted to do a familiar type of epic adventure in an unfamiliar way—not only by telling the epic adventures and journey of four adventurous children (one of them being a white boy, the other three being a trio of ethnic girls who are white and blonde, black, and Asian, respectively (just like Dexter, Dee Dee, and Mee Mee and Lee Lee from Dexter’s Laboratory)) on an epic, heroic quest through a sweeping, epic, unknown world inhabited by humans and dinosaurs, in order for one of the adventurous kids (the Asian girl) stop an ancient Sauron-type evil resurrected after centuries in the form of a rival neighbor of the boy’s (just like Dexter’s Lab’s Mandark)—very similar to and being a dinosaur-infused throwback to the sort of movie involving adventurous children that we used to be exposed to such as 1985’s The Goonies as well as some of the epic quest/themes, battles, and details of Lord of the Rings—but also by conceiving and producing what might ostensibly be a live action movie project from a entirely animated framework—just like what Alfonso Cuaron has done with his 2013 movie Gravity—but also from the concept designs and illustrated storyboards by, say, Genndy Tartakovsky, the Russian-born but Chicago-bred and US-based cult animator who gave us Samurai Jack and Dexter’s Laboratory.
I always wanted to do an epic film like this, set in a sweeping, epic world of great danger and beauty shared by modern humans and living dinosaurs, and presumably designed by someone such as or like Genndy Tartakovsky, the creator of Samurai Jack, ever since I was about 15 or younger.
Yes, I have always dreamed of creating a sweeping, epic world of great beauty and danger, populated by dinosaurs and humans, but I have yet to actually have a screenplay, or even a particular story in mind—but rather more of a sense of time and place from which I might ultimately extract the story I want to tell.
Maybe I might someday ask someone such as or like Samurai Jack/Dexter’s Laboratory creator and Hotel Transylvania Director Genndy Tartakovsky to start designing an epic world and its human inhabitants and dinosaur wildlife, etc., and that person, such as or like Genndy, might produce thousands of intricately detailed sketches—concept drawings and/or illustrated storyboards—of the human and dinosaur inhabitants of a sweepingly epic landscape of a world.
And it will be the characters, creatures, locations, cultures, etc. designed by Genndy Tartakovsky or some other person that might inspire my epic film project that might come with a working title by the name of “Project TIMBOX-129”.
And of course, animation plays such a seamless role in live-action production nowadays that some films which are identified as live-action are mostly animated. This may seem like a trivial distinction, but when such films are presented to the public as live-action, it devalues the role of animation artists in the process. Quite simply, these films would not exist without animators.
And I think Project TIMBOX-129 might be just another perfect example of these new technology-driven, animation-heavy hybrid films, in that:
A) It will involve the concept designs and extensive storyboarding by some Russian-born, Chicago-bred, USA-based cult animator who gave us cult cartoons such as the likes of Samurai Jack and Dexter’s Laboratory (i.e., Genndy Tartakovsky) or some other person.
B) It will also use previsualization to a larger extent than almost any other live-action film
and
C) It will be animated once in its entirely before live actors (and even the people at Peter Jackson’s New Zealand-based Lord of the Rings effects house Weta Workshop/Weta Digital) even enter my production that will go by the working title Project TIMBOX-129.
First, Genndy Tartakovsky or someone else may create concept designs and an extensive use of illustrated storyboards for, say, Project TIMBOX-129, and from there, a complete version of the movie might be made inside a computer, based on or inspired by, say, Genndy Tartakovsky’s initial concept and storyboard drawings and illustrations. But it may be unusual for a live action movie like mine to be prevised as well as being designed and story-boarded by, say, a cult TV animator or so.
Like I said, from the initial concept design and storyboard drawings of, say, Genndy Tartakovsky, people could essentially create a Genndy Tarakovsky/Pixar-style animation of the movie containing everything but the live actors and settings.
While the dinosaurs/creatures and/or some of the props needed to look ultra-real, the human characters in the previz such as the four adventurous children at the heart of my epic tale (possibly a white boy, a white and blonde girl, a black girl and an Asian girl) might have a cartoony, Genndy Tartakovsky-inspired look—at least in the storyboards and previz.
But rather than just serving as a reference and planning tool, a combination of highly stylized imagery created in, say, Genndy Tartakovsky’s storyboards and concept design drawings, as well as detailed imagery created in the previsualization stage might become the basis for the movie itself… in some scenes in my movie, the live actors some live action props and/or even some actual filmed live action backdrops shall be among some or a few things that might be real live action camera shots.
The dinosaurs and their action may often be computer imagery. Some, or even a couple, physical sets will also be built.
The list goes on and on.
Like I said, I wanted to do the whole live action movie as first as a feature animation based on and inspired by initial concept designs and illustrations as well as initial storyboards by, say, Genndy Tartakovsky or someone else, And from there, we might edit that animation, even with sound, just to make sure the timing worked with the music and sound effects.
And once we were happy with it, we shall have to do the lighting in the animation as well. And then from there, all that animation (along with, say, Genndy Tartakovsky’s initial concept designs and initial storyboards) should translate into actual camera moves and positions for the lighting, actors and so on…we shall animate the whole thing for years and years before we will shoot the live actors and other real live elements.
Then we will shoot the film in live action, and so those poor animators will have had to start from scratch because they will have to based their final animations on what was shot in live action as well.
Someone may suggest that we may call [Project TIMBOX-129] ‘animation’ but I do not think I can because there will also be a fair amount of live action in it as well!
And of course, it may have to be really hard work for the animators, but hey! At least you learn how to draw based on horizons and weight, which are two main elements.
Anyway, as film production evolves, so too must our terminologies. If the heightened importance of animators in contemporary filmmaking is accurately represented, there is a net benefit to the community. The term ‘hybrid film’ has sometimes been used, which is a good start. That term, however shall not effectively describe a movie that is an ostensibly live action movie conceived and produced from a completely animated framework!
Anyway, Project TIMBOX-129, in its ultimate, final, finished shape and form, might tell of the epic adventures and journey of four adventurous children (one of them being a white boy, the other three being a trio of ethnic girls who are white and blonde, black, and Asian, respectively (just like Dexter, Dee Dee, and Mee Mee and Lee Lee from Dexter’s Laboratory)) on an epic, heroic quest through a sweeping, epic, unknown world inhabited by humans and dinosaurs, in order for one of the adventurous kids (the Asian girl) stop an ancient Sauron-type evil resurrected after centuries in the form of a rival neighbor of the boy’s (just like Dexter’s Lab’s Mandark)—very similar to and being a dinosaur-infused throwback to the sort of movie involving adventurous children that we used to be exposed to such as 1985’s The Goonies as well as some of the epic quest/themes, battles, and details of Lord of the Rings.
And so, what would you think of such a project?

I always wanted to do a familiar type of epic adventure in an unfamiliar way—not only by telling the epic adventures and journey of four adventurous children (one of them being a white boy, the other three being a trio of ethnic girls who are white and blonde, black, and Asian, respectively (just like Dexter, Dee Dee, and Mee Mee and Lee Lee from Dexter’s Laboratory)) on an epic, heroic quest through a sweeping, epic, unknown world inhabited by humans and dinosaurs, in order for one of the adventurous kids (the Asian girl) stop an ancient Sauron-type evil resurrected after centuries in the form of a rival neighbor of the boy’s (just like Dexter’s Lab’s Mandark)—very similar to and being a dinosaur-infused throwback to the sort of movie involving adventurous children that we used to be exposed to such as 1985’s The Goonies as well as some of the epic quest/themes, battles, and details of Lord of the Rings—but also by conceiving and producing what might ostensibly be a live action movie project from a entirely animated framework—just like what Alfonso Cuaron has done with his 2013 movie Gravity—but also from the concept designs and illustrated storyboards by, say, Genndy Tartakovsky, the Russian-born but Chicago-bred and US-based cult animator who gave us Samurai Jack and Dexter’s Laboratory.

I always wanted to do an epic film like this, set in a sweeping, epic world of great danger and beauty shared by modern humans and living dinosaurs, and presumably designed by someone such as or like Genndy Tartakovsky, the creator of Samurai Jack, ever since I was about 15 or younger.

Yes, I have always dreamed of creating a sweeping, epic world of great beauty and danger, populated by dinosaurs and humans, but I have yet to actually have a screenplay, or even a particular story in mind—but rather more of a sense of time and place from which I might ultimately extract the story I want to tell.

Maybe I might someday ask someone such as or like Samurai Jack/Dexter’s Laboratory creator and Hotel Transylvania Director Genndy Tartakovsky to start designing an epic world and its human inhabitants and dinosaur wildlife, etc., and that person, such as or like Genndy, might produce thousands of intricately detailed sketches—concept drawings and/or illustrated storyboards—of the human and dinosaur inhabitants of a sweepingly epic landscape of a world.

And it will be the characters, creatures, locations, cultures, etc. designed by Genndy Tartakovsky or some other person that might inspire my epic film project that might come with a working title by the name of “Project TIMBOX-129”.

And of course, animation plays such a seamless role in live-action production nowadays that some films which are identified as live-action are mostly animated. This may seem like a trivial distinction, but when such films are presented to the public as live-action, it devalues the role of animation artists in the process. Quite simply, these films would not exist without animators.

And I think Project TIMBOX-129 might be just another perfect example of these new technology-driven, animation-heavy hybrid films, in that:

A) It will involve the concept designs and extensive storyboarding by some Russian-born, Chicago-bred, USA-based cult animator who gave us cult cartoons such as the likes of Samurai Jack and Dexter’s Laboratory (i.e., Genndy Tartakovsky) or some other person.

B) It will also use previsualization to a larger extent than almost any other live-action film

and

C) It will be animated once in its entirely before live actors (and even the people at Peter Jackson’s New Zealand-based Lord of the Rings effects house Weta Workshop/Weta Digital) even enter my production that will go by the working title Project TIMBOX-129.

First, Genndy Tartakovsky or someone else may create concept designs and an extensive use of illustrated storyboards for, say, Project TIMBOX-129, and from there, a complete version of the movie might be made inside a computer, based on or inspired by, say, Genndy Tartakovsky’s initial concept and storyboard drawings and illustrations. But it may be unusual for a live action movie like mine to be prevised as well as being designed and story-boarded by, say, a cult TV animator or so.

Like I said, from the initial concept design and storyboard drawings of, say, Genndy Tartakovsky, people could essentially create a Genndy Tarakovsky/Pixar-style animation of the movie containing everything but the live actors and settings.

While the dinosaurs/creatures and/or some of the props needed to look ultra-real, the human characters in the previz such as the four adventurous children at the heart of my epic tale (possibly a white boy, a white and blonde girl, a black girl and an Asian girl) might have a cartoony, Genndy Tartakovsky-inspired look—at least in the storyboards and previz.

But rather than just serving as a reference and planning tool, a combination of highly stylized imagery created in, say, Genndy Tartakovsky’s storyboards and concept design drawings, as well as detailed imagery created in the previsualization stage might become the basis for the movie itself… in some scenes in my movie, the live actors some live action props and/or even some actual filmed live action backdrops shall be among some or a few things that might be real live action camera shots.

The dinosaurs and their action may often be computer imagery. Some, or even a couple, physical sets will also be built.

The list goes on and on.

Like I said, I wanted to do the whole live action movie as first as a feature animation based on and inspired by initial concept designs and illustrations as well as initial storyboards by, say, Genndy Tartakovsky or someone else, And from there, we might edit that animation, even with sound, just to make sure the timing worked with the music and sound effects.

And once we were happy with it, we shall have to do the lighting in the animation as well. And then from there, all that animation (along with, say, Genndy Tartakovsky’s initial concept designs and initial storyboards) should translate into actual camera moves and positions for the lighting, actors and so on…we shall animate the whole thing for years and years before we will shoot the live actors and other real live elements.

Then we will shoot the film in live action, and so those poor animators will have had to start from scratch because they will have to based their final animations on what was shot in live action as well.

Someone may suggest that we may call [Project TIMBOX-129] ‘animation’ but I do not think I can because there will also be a fair amount of live action in it as well!

And of course, it may have to be really hard work for the animators, but hey! At least you learn how to draw based on horizons and weight, which are two main elements.

Anyway, as film production evolves, so too must our terminologies. If the heightened importance of animators in contemporary filmmaking is accurately represented, there is a net benefit to the community. The term ‘hybrid film’ has sometimes been used, which is a good start. That term, however shall not effectively describe a movie that is an ostensibly live action movie conceived and produced from a completely animated framework!

Anyway, Project TIMBOX-129, in its ultimate, final, finished shape and form, might tell of the epic adventures and journey of four adventurous children (one of them being a white boy, the other three being a trio of ethnic girls who are white and blonde, black, and Asian, respectively (just like Dexter, Dee Dee, and Mee Mee and Lee Lee from Dexter’s Laboratory)) on an epic, heroic quest through a sweeping, epic, unknown world inhabited by humans and dinosaurs, in order for one of the adventurous kids (the Asian girl) stop an ancient Sauron-type evil resurrected after centuries in the form of a rival neighbor of the boy’s (just like Dexter’s Lab’s Mandark)—very similar to and being a dinosaur-infused throwback to the sort of movie involving adventurous children that we used to be exposed to such as 1985’s The Goonies as well as some of the epic quest/themes, battles, and details of Lord of the Rings.

And so, what would you think of such a project?

Hello.
I am searching for Genndy Tartakovsky’s 2007 Demo Reel for the now-defunct Orphanage Commercial Productions company, but I can’t find it anymore and the link is dead now that The Orphanage (and Orphanage Commercial Productions along with it) was dissolved five years ago:
http://theorphanage.com/ocp/ocp/qt_popup/5/1247/video_small
Is the Genndy Tartakovskty 2007 Demo Reel lost and destroyed? Will anyone please help me on my quest for the lost Genndy Tartakovsky 2007 Director’s Demo Reel for Orphanage Commercial Productions, or else I will lose hope in finding it?

Hello.

I am searching for Genndy Tartakovsky’s 2007 Demo Reel for the now-defunct Orphanage Commercial Productions company, but I can’t find it anymore and the link is dead now that The Orphanage (and Orphanage Commercial Productions along with it) was dissolved five years ago:

http://theorphanage.com/ocp/ocp/qt_popup/5/1247/video_small

Is the Genndy Tartakovskty 2007 Demo Reel lost and destroyed? Will anyone please help me on my quest for the lost Genndy Tartakovsky 2007 Director’s Demo Reel for Orphanage Commercial Productions, or else I will lose hope in finding it?

TimBoxReloaded Tumblr Post # 1,635:

What would you think if the 2003 two-part Emmy Award winning Samurai Jack episode, The Birth of Evil, would ever to be shown and presented someday in the large-format, giant-screen IMAX process (just like when Disney’s Fantasia/2000 (1999) was shown in IMAX)?

T O O N T A L K E R
Two Worlds (the live action human world (presented mainly in a 1.85:1 ratio and muted color scheme with earthen versions of colors selected in the cartoon world scenes) and a dimension inhabited by highly stylized Genndy Tartakovsky-esque Samurai Jack-style and largely 2D hand drawn animated cartoons(and which will widen the screen aspect ratio to 2.39:1 and not to mention, dramatically brighten the color palette as well)—one that is as fully realized as Middle-earth, the original Star Wars universe and James Cameron’s Avatar’s Pandora…
Two Directors (possibly yours truly, Timothy McKenzie (directing the live action and special effects-related work) and/or Genndy Tartakovsky or some other supervising animation director (directing, supervising and/or overseeing the animation itself))…
One Kid who can communicate with animated cartoons (Brandon Robertson)…
12 Years (from Age 6 or 7 to Age 18 or 19)…
12 live action/animated hybrid movies…
One Epic Coming-Of-Age Saga…
One Extended and Heartfelt Homage/Tribute/Theatrical Big Screen Throwback to Genndy Tartakovsky and Genndy Tartakovsky’s animation work in the ways best suited to the talents, genius, and television animation prime of the Russian-born but Chicago-bred and US-based cult animator that gave us Samurai Jack and Dexter’s Laboratory…
ToonTalker, which is to film the same live action kid hero as he aged in real time over 12 years (and around the native Maryland of yours truly as well as with the live action for all twelve live action/animated movies made within the same time period as each other and tailored into a multi-part structure), will chronicle the life and heroic epic adventures back-and-forth between the human and [highly stylized] animated cartoon dimensions of Brandon Robertson, The Boy Who Could Talk to Cartoons.
We shall see Brandon magically shuttle back-and-forth in his travels between the human and cartoon worlds, cope with not one, but two families who act as his greatest supports (The Robertsons, his own family in the live action human world, and an animated cartoon Japanese family—presumably the jet repairman Tengu and his Japanese family from Samurai Jack Episode XXVI Jack’s Sandals or so), endure his epic struggles against the evil Dark Lord, Khan Morgo the Demon-lord, and his hordes of evil minions, enroll in not one, but two different schools (Elementary School, Middle School, High School and College in the live action dimension; The Cartoonstitute in the cartoon world that opens its doors to peoples of all demeanor, of class, of race, of gender, of religion, of national origin, of grade level, of creed, the list goes on and on), fall in love (presumably with one of the two Japanese girls that Samurai Jack passes by (I mean the teenage one!)) and ultimately defeated Khan Morgo and his evil forces by healing the Great Crystal Stone (a giant floating rainbow-hued and once shattered crystal monolith that reposes in the Cartoonstitute) with its missing green Emerald Shard at the exact moment the morning sun rises over Baltimore’s Downtown and Inner Harbor areas at cockcrow when all seems lost for the forces of good after The Great Collision of the Two Worlds releases the toons from their world into our own when midnight strikes—before ending the saga by settling down with his new life as a college freshman.
ToonTalker is gonna be a grand-scale epic cinematic saga of a grand cinematic experiment not only from a live action director like hopefully yours truly, but also from a cult animator who previously gave us Dexter’s Lab and Samurai Jack, but none of it would have happened had the live action child actor playing Brandon Robertson lost interest or pull a Justin Bieber-type or Lindsay Lohan-type schmuck trick, but hopefully the live child actor playing Brandon will do neither of that!
As Brandon’s epic heroic time lapse journey/adventures begins, he shall be an adorable innocent six year old boy doing what six year old boy normally do: watching cartoons, being tortured by his older brother and so on. But then, as if by magic,  he began to talk back to the toons (and the toons talking back to him as if by magic), and he began to investigate the mysterious magical powers of the TV, only to be sucked into another dimension—the one inhabited by highly stylized Genndy Tartakovsky-esque Samurai Jack-style and largely hand drawn animated cartoons—where he began to assemble human and cartoon friends, allies or enemies.
About every time a new feature length installment begin, the ToonTalker saga shall jump from one year to the next, and Brandon shall change slightly.
In fact, one of ToonTalker’s many magic tricks is that for over 12 years, me and Genndy Tartakovsky or some other supervising animation director should gathered their same respective casts and crews to make an entire series of twelve animated/live action hybrid movies that checks in on the lives of their characters—human, cartoon or otherwise—all made within the same time period as each other—and ultimately weaving an epic, complex, intimate, and even lavishly-realized coming-of-age tapestry sequence in twelve feature film parts that each cover a year in the life and epic adventures of a young Maryland boy who can communicate with/talk to animated cartoons named Brandon.
And besides being a more epic and at times dramatic coming of age variant on Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) and the like, ToonTalker Years/Films One through Twelve will also interweave a medley of references to and tropes from Genndy Tartakovsky’s TV animation work such as Samurai Jack and Dexter’s Laboratory—this time on the big screen!
And so, what would think of all that?

T O O N T A L K E R

Two Worlds (the live action human world (presented mainly in a 1.85:1 ratio and muted color scheme with earthen versions of colors selected in the cartoon world scenes) and a dimension inhabited by highly stylized Genndy Tartakovsky-esque Samurai Jack-style and largely 2D hand drawn animated cartoons(and which will widen the screen aspect ratio to 2.39:1 and not to mention, dramatically brighten the color palette as well)—one that is as fully realized as Middle-earth, the original Star Wars universe and James Cameron’s Avatar’s Pandora

Two Directors (possibly yours truly, Timothy McKenzie (directing the live action and special effects-related work) and/or Genndy Tartakovsky or some other supervising animation director (directing, supervising and/or overseeing the animation itself))…

One Kid who can communicate with animated cartoons (Brandon Robertson)…

12 Years (from Age 6 or 7 to Age 18 or 19)…

12 live action/animated hybrid movies…

One Epic Coming-Of-Age Saga…

One Extended and Heartfelt Homage/Tribute/Theatrical Big Screen Throwback to Genndy Tartakovsky and Genndy Tartakovsky’s animation work in the ways best suited to the talents, genius, and television animation prime of the Russian-born but Chicago-bred and US-based cult animator that gave us Samurai Jack and Dexter’s Laboratory…

ToonTalker, which is to film the same live action kid hero as he aged in real time over 12 years (and around the native Maryland of yours truly as well as with the live action for all twelve live action/animated movies made within the same time period as each other and tailored into a multi-part structure), will chronicle the life and heroic epic adventures back-and-forth between the human and [highly stylized] animated cartoon dimensions of Brandon Robertson, The Boy Who Could Talk to Cartoons.

We shall see Brandon magically shuttle back-and-forth in his travels between the human and cartoon worlds, cope with not one, but two families who act as his greatest supports (The Robertsons, his own family in the live action human world, and an animated cartoon Japanese family—presumably the jet repairman Tengu and his Japanese family from Samurai Jack Episode XXVI Jack’s Sandals or so), endure his epic struggles against the evil Dark Lord, Khan Morgo the Demon-lord, and his hordes of evil minions, enroll in not one, but two different schools (Elementary School, Middle School, High School and College in the live action dimension; The Cartoonstitute in the cartoon world that opens its doors to peoples of all demeanor, of class, of race, of gender, of religion, of national origin, of grade level, of creed, the list goes on and on), fall in love (presumably with one of the two Japanese girls that Samurai Jack passes by (I mean the teenage one!)) and ultimately defeated Khan Morgo and his evil forces by healing the Great Crystal Stone (a giant floating rainbow-hued and once shattered crystal monolith that reposes in the Cartoonstitute) with its missing green Emerald Shard at the exact moment the morning sun rises over Baltimore’s Downtown and Inner Harbor areas at cockcrow when all seems lost for the forces of good after The Great Collision of the Two Worlds releases the toons from their world into our own when midnight strikes—before ending the saga by settling down with his new life as a college freshman.

ToonTalker is gonna be a grand-scale epic cinematic saga of a grand cinematic experiment not only from a live action director like hopefully yours truly, but also from a cult animator who previously gave us Dexter’s Lab and Samurai Jack, but none of it would have happened had the live action child actor playing Brandon Robertson lost interest or pull a Justin Bieber-type or Lindsay Lohan-type schmuck trick, but hopefully the live child actor playing Brandon will do neither of that!

As Brandon’s epic heroic time lapse journey/adventures begins, he shall be an adorable innocent six year old boy doing what six year old boy normally do: watching cartoons, being tortured by his older brother and so on. But then, as if by magic,  he began to talk back to the toons (and the toons talking back to him as if by magic), and he began to investigate the mysterious magical powers of the TV, only to be sucked into another dimension—the one inhabited by highly stylized Genndy Tartakovsky-esque Samurai Jack-style and largely hand drawn animated cartoons—where he began to assemble human and cartoon friends, allies or enemies.

About every time a new feature length installment begin, the ToonTalker saga shall jump from one year to the next, and Brandon shall change slightly.

In fact, one of ToonTalker’s many magic tricks is that for over 12 years, me and Genndy Tartakovsky or some other supervising animation director should gathered their same respective casts and crews to make an entire series of twelve animated/live action hybrid movies that checks in on the lives of their characters—human, cartoon or otherwise—all made within the same time period as each other—and ultimately weaving an epic, complex, intimate, and even lavishly-realized coming-of-age tapestry sequence in twelve feature film parts that each cover a year in the life and epic adventures of a young Maryland boy who can communicate with/talk to animated cartoons named Brandon.

And besides being a more epic and at times dramatic coming of age variant on Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) and the like, ToonTalker Years/Films One through Twelve will also interweave a medley of references to and tropes from Genndy Tartakovsky’s TV animation work such as Samurai Jack and Dexter’s Laboratory—this time on the big screen!

And so, what would think of all that?